Saturday, 13 November 2010

Another week has flown by

A week of seeing this when I sit down;
So it was off to the wood for a shoot, first 3 drives were moderately busy, we were 1 gun down so a few birds slipped through. Still managed to bag 3 nice Cock birds even if our cartridge ratio was all to pot;
After lunch the "hump" drive sounded like a gangster film finale, yes at least 5 woodcock were flushed so that may explain it, nothing hit though. The tally was lifted by a pair of cocks and a squirell (thanks big Richard) on the last 2 drives. As usual the birds seem to find the hole in the line;
On getting home it seems that everyone had a good day, Steve a former trainee of mine managed a nice buck with his .243. The head comes tomorrow for boiling out;


8 comments:

Anonymous said...

"The head comes tomorrow for boiling out"

Why would someone bother going to the bother of skinning and then boiling out such a pish poor head?

Its obviously a cull buck. Lacking size and uniformity. The fishtailing is a clear indication of poor management in previous years. As is usually the case with Fallow.

Wouldn't it have been easier to simply hang such a poor head in a convenient tree and waited for nature to do its thing. It would have been all done with by the end of the season and ready to take home and nail to the shed wall.

Bambibasher said...

Not a magical trophy perhaps but his first deer and therefore worthy of immortalising. I keep as many skulls as possible especially odd and malformed ones. Its the does which tend to be boring bi=ut their jaws and teeth reveal a lot about aging the beasts.

Bambibasher said...

There is a wood with many mummyfied heads hanging in it, with the time taken for nature to rot them down I'd rather boil them myself anyway.

Anonymous said...

Personally I can't see the appeal of keeping heads, unless they have something of the unusual or have that appeal that comes from symmetry, form and good development, thereby making them worthy of a medal. Even if they are the first ever or first timers of a particular species. A quick snap shot is all that's required. Save the wall space for something worth the time and effort.

Ageing by teeth wear is a complex subject and can only be considered an exact science if you have access to tooth sectioning equipment. Very few non-scientific stalkers have ready access to that sort of kit.

However if you can build up a large enough selection from one given location you can at least start to make informed guesses at the ages of your culled deer. To often I have seen non professional deer managers slit the cheeks of a said beast in order to take a squint at the beast teeth and then state its age.Without any worthwhile reference data concerning the deer from that particular location.When in reality all you can do with any certainty is decide on whether its falls into the 3 principle age groups.

Bambibasher said...

It happens that I do agree with what you have said, remember though that this chap has just embarked upon his stalking career and a head to mark this is important to him, I have many memories and a wall or two full of trophies but the most interesting heads arent always the best medal ones and as such he is to be commended for his interest in the subject and the start of the study of what have become his deer. Be a pity if that head is replicated in a year and he has nothing more than a photo for comparisom!

Anonymous said...

I agree that interest and medal score don't always go hand in hand. The only head I have ever bothered to hang that wasn't worthy of a medal is a perruque headed roe doe.

I am certain that the head in the picture will be repeated this year, next year and for many years to come. If not by this stalker by some other novice. As it is a typical of a large proportion of our mismanaged fallow population.

Bambibasher said...

Then keeping the head is personal to him and is also a good way of checking. Not submitting it for scoring is no problem, I dont do that anyway. I find the trophy thing a little odd anyway. I use odd heads to teach cull targets and this one if it was mine would be kept for that purpose. I hope you agree that taking this beast was the right thing to do. I feel that he has made a start and should be congratulated for thinning out the poorer specimens from the population.

Anonymous said...

Isn't that one of the appeals of non professional stalking in that (the need to achieve cull figures aside) it is mostly personal?
I'm not an advocate of collecting bone for the sake of it. But as I have said I can't see the appeal in bothering with a basically poor specimen of a widely distributed species. Even if it is your first chalk mark on the score board.
I think it would be just as easy to show a poor head from a decent photo in a teaching environment.

I agree completely that the buck in question was a very viable candidate for the gamedealers chiller.

Its a pity that more amateurs and professional alike were not more selective in their choices of which buck to take out of the gene pool.

I read a recent account of a stalker allowing a client to shoot one of the only two sika hinds ever seen in a locality. They were mixed in with a bunch of fallow does. Whilst Sika are not what you would call rare I can see little other than money to be gained from shooting one of the only two in a given location.